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wiki:tcb:operation:functions [2017/03/04 00:41]
opadmin [Intro to Functions & Triggers]
wiki:tcb:operation:functions [2018/04/07 21:38] (current)
opadmin [Intro to Functions & Triggers]
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 Triggers cause a function to be executed. Triggers are how you make things happen. Triggers can be any Aux channel on your transmitter. The Turret Stick is another trigger with 9 positions (the four corners, the four ends, and centered). If one of the I/O ports has been set to "​Input"​ it too will show up as a trigger. Other triggers are actually events rather than inputs. ​ Triggers cause a function to be executed. Triggers are how you make things happen. Triggers can be any Aux channel on your transmitter. The Turret Stick is another trigger with 9 positions (the four corners, the four ends, and centered). If one of the I/O ports has been set to "​Input"​ it too will show up as a trigger. Other triggers are actually events rather than inputs. ​
  
-There are two basic types of triggers which we call "​Analog"​ and "​Digital."​ These names are not used in a strict technical sense but rather to represent the basic difference between the two types. A simple way to understand the difference is that a digital trigger is like the on/off switch on your stereo, and an analog trigger is like the volume control. Digital triggers have a finite number of positions, but the number of positions can be more than just on and off. Digital triggers can be switches on your transmitter that might have 2 or 3 positions. The Turret Stick as already mentioned is considered a digital trigger with 9 positions. On the other hand, Analog triggers are variable inputs. The best example is a knob, dial, or lever on your transmitter. You can also set one of the A or B I/O ports to analog input and attach a potentiometer to create another analog trigger.+There are two basic types of triggers which we call "​Analog"​ and "​Digital."​ These names are not used in a strict technical sense but rather to represent the basic difference between the two types. A simple way to understand the difference is that a digital trigger is like the on/off switch on your stereo, and an analog trigger is like the volume control. Digital triggers have a finite number of positions, but the number of positions can be more than just on and off. Digital triggers can be switches on your transmitter that might have 2or more positions. The Turret Stick as already mentioned is considered a digital trigger with 9 positions. On the other hand, Analog triggers are variable inputs. The best example is a knob, dial, or lever on your transmitter. You can also set one of the A or B I/O ports to analog input and attach a potentiometer to create another analog trigger.
  
 Digital triggers can be assigned to functions that cause a discrete action, analog functions can be assigned to functions that //modify// something or //adjust// some value. Digital triggers can be assigned to functions that cause a discrete action, analog functions can be assigned to functions that //modify// something or //adjust// some value.
wiki/tcb/operation/functions.txt ยท Last modified: 2018/04/07 21:38 by opadmin